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Topic: Too Much Practice?

It has been a somewhat strange last couple of days as far as my whip cracking is concerned.
I have been practicing much more than I usually do lately.  The 10/10 Challenge is very motivating.  However in the last couple of days some cracks which I found mindlessly easy to pull off typically, all of a sudden I seem to be making more errors than I was.

I am wondering if it is because I am expanding my repertoire, learning the Victorian Cutback and the Coachman's Crack, within such a short time.

Does anyone else experience this?

In vino veritas

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Re: Too Much Practice?

I think it's beneficial and even mandatory to learning to take breaks in practicing. You just have to listen to your body.

For me all the progress has happened when I'm NOT practicing - it's like the realizations have to settle on before you get new ones practicing. Your subconscious mind also works on these things.

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Re: Too Much Practice?

You possess some good self-awareness and insight Erik.  I never thought of these things.
I might take a break for a day or two.
Thank you for sharing your view smile

In vino veritas

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Re: Too Much Practice?

Erik Torpström wrote:

For me all the progress has happened when I'm NOT practicing - it's like the realizations have to settle on before you get new ones practicing. Your subconscious mind also works on these things.

Absolutely spot on, EriK! I find exactly the same thing in music. I can't really play a piece decently until I've internalised it, in the sense of having a clear mental grasp of exactly how it's put together, and of what I want to express in playing it. Of course, when it comes to performance, it's not mechanical: there's still plenty of room for 'expression in the moment'. I think it's just the same with whip-cracking.

'Less is often more!'

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Re: Too Much Practice?

Russel, I have found that it's a lack of concentration on the "mastered" cracks while concentrating on the cracks you are trying to learn.

In combinations I sort of take the cracks I know for granted and concentrate on the upcoming crack in the combo that I am trying to learn.

Just going back to the cracks you feel comfortable with and practice them with as much concentration as you are giving to the new cracks will help a lot to keep your cracking sharp with all cracks.

Ron

Yesterday I spotted an albino dalmatian.
It was the least I could do for him.

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Re: Too Much Practice?

Russell, I find the same is true with my drawings.  Some nights, I'll work so hard to get something to look right and no matter what I do, it looks like crap.  So I'll set it aside for a day or two and when I come back to it, it happens almost effortlessly. 

Good Luck!

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Re: Too Much Practice?

Awww Erik!  That new avatar though...Love it. 

If you find a certain crack giving you trouble, I think it's okay to move on to another for a bit.  I find when practicing, I will have a string of perfect cracks one day, then the next day it all blows up.  Set a goal, even if you only do it right once, tell yourself, "Once or twice correctly and then I can do something else."  Keep it casual.

Due to rising costs, dirty deeds are no longer done dirt cheap. 
                                                                                    ~Management

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Re: Too Much Practice?

I find that the process of thinking things through - watch some of the movies gives just as much as actually holding the whip in hand. Gives me a possibility to reflect on what i am doing or dont do - details i might have missed

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Re: Too Much Practice?

Agreed, you can learn to consistently fluke something quickly, but really taking every bit of it in takes some time just thinking about it.

'Sic Parvis Magna'

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Re: Too Much Practice?

Yeah Erik, love the new avatar.

Ron

Yesterday I spotted an albino dalmatian.
It was the least I could do for him.

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Re: Too Much Practice?

Thanks guys but keep on topic will ya wink

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Re: Too Much Practice?

Cool comments and perspectives smile thanks for sharing your thoughts everyone.
I think you hit the nail on the head when you talked about taking something you have learned and feel comfortable with for granted Ron.
And Matt, I know what you mean by fluking something in the early stages too.
Erik I think it might prove popular to start up a thread about how appealing your new avatar picture is mate big_smile

In vino veritas

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Re: Too Much Practice?

All of you have very valid points and its good to hear that I'm not alone.  I find it is so easy to get hung up on something that should just be a bump in the road but it ends up being a huge rut because I seem to obsess over it . That ends up taking me out of a relaxed state which ends up effecting my focus on other things. So I know that you guys are on the money with advice like slow down, calm down, relax, don't get frustrated.  This brought to mind a few quotes. I will just add one so I don't bog this thread down with them but, I may add a few on another thread if it's ok.

“Everything you do, if not in a relaxed state will be done at a lesser level than you are proficient. Thus the tensed expert marksman will aim at a level less than his/her student.”
– Bruce Lee

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Re: Too Much Practice?

Naturally, I agree with Robert on this one. Relax, take a break, too much practice can definitely tire you out and keep you from practicing well. Don't hurt yourself or exhaust yourself practicing too much.

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Re: Too Much Practice?

I call that "The Valley of Death". And - trust me - it is completely normal. Why... Pretty simple. When you start to work on a crack, you are completely inexperienced. You have no idea, no opinion and no clue. You just do it. And when it works, you try desperately to see, check and analyze each single step. Now it comes. Next time you try the same technique, you are no more spontaneous. You try to work from the list, you have in your mind. And that can't work.


Example. Tennis. You see the ball coming. You swing the racket and that's it. Next time you have a piece of paper on which you noticed every single step you need to hit the ball. Do I have to say that you'll miss completely, because you are more concentrated to read the technical instructions instead of simply hitting the ball...? When someone says that you learn when you do nothing, it should be: "You forget the plans you had in your mind, when you do nothing." That makes it easier for you the next time".


In other words: "The Valley of Death" means, that you try to reproduce the crack in your head, while cracking. And that will never work. Therefore I tell my students to think on something different, when they practice. Ask Jessie and Robert. They had lessons with me.


Robby

I have a screwdriver. I am Legend...

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Re: Too Much Practice?

"The Valley of Death" wow that really sticks, these catch phrases you give make it very easy to recall the broad strokes of what you are explaining, and I understand that on occasion one must distract or trick your own mind to achieve a result. Thank you for sharing your thoughts on this topic!

In vino veritas

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Re: Too Much Practice?

I couldn't contain myself any longer.  I went out this morning to take Keyzer for a walk and practiced for just over an hour as well.
That day off worked wonders.  I feel much more composed and relaxed.
I'm even pulling off the Victorian cutback regularly so I am really pleased.

Thanks for the advice everyone smile

In vino veritas

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Re: Too Much Practice?

Well done Russell! smile

(And I'm sure Keyser enjoyed his walk, too!)

'Less is often more!'

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Re: Too Much Practice?

Good job.
I'm glad that the short break paid off for you.

Ron

Yesterday I spotted an albino dalmatian.
It was the least I could do for him.

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Re: Too Much Practice?

Thank you gentlemen smile
I've been listening to the album Clannad - Legend for the last couple of days while driving in my car.

It's helped mellowed me out I think haha

In vino veritas