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Topic: Whip #4

Starting this thread because I know it will help with the learning process.  Suggestions and comment will be much appreciated. My goal is to create a decent wood handled whip with approximately 6' thong, and fairly light weight.

I started with an approx. 3'-0"  tt core. (no photo) Have since seen Rachel's excellent video on this and probably wasn't as tightly twisted but it was pretty stiff ( next will be better)  It was bound pretty well with sinew,  then an 8 plait belly.  It is tied off at 39" and 4 strands currently remain.  My plan is to trim two of the 4 strands and stagger two when reached with the 12 plait overlay.  Not sure how many strands will be in the overlay at that point.  First photo is the bound 8 plait belly, then about 16" of 12 plait overlay. 
https://i.postimg.cc/5NrfWTPY/IMG-0825.jpg

https://i.postimg.cc/2jsJgHXT/IMG-0826.jpg

  About 2-1/2" will go into the handle.  An ideal hole size according to my overlay diameter will be approximately .700  More on this when the handle gets made. Meanwhile, considering where the first strands will drop.  Thanks for looking and C&C always welcome

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Re: Whip #4

That's a very good start, Hayes.

With the binding, I try to do it incrementally with the closer binding towards the handle and gradually spacing out the binding the further down the belly you go.

I do just about everything in 3s or 1/3s,  with binding, and overlay.
I don't have an exact scientific or mathematical reason. I just like the number 3 or 1/3s. Maybe there's a reason in physics for this, but I don't know what that might be.

This by no means, is the perfect way or even the right way. It's certainly not the only way. It's just my way.

You are progressing very nicely and the chevrons look straight too.
Good job.

Ron

It's ok if you disagree with me.
I can't force you to be right.

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Re: Whip #4

Looking good Hayes, like Ron I also work in 3s and once you know where your belly will end you can do a simple bit of math to work out the drop points, most people eyeball it but I'm very OCD lol also when you end bellies binding them up can cause kinks in the whip so you do a temporary binding with tape or just finish bellies with a twisted taper (that's my current method)
All in all you eventually find a way that works best for you, we all have our own little ways smile

Yes I wear a hat, no my names not Indiana Jones...........

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Re: Whip #4

Thank you for the replies.

Ron, in regard to the binding, closely spaced toward the handle, more relaxed further down the belly, ( to aid in the rollout of the whip, right?).  Hopefully I didn't go too heavy toward the tip  An attempt was made to compensate for a more flimsy area of the core. Not sure if this was a wise choice or possible to do but manually flexing the core was considered.

Still not clear on what the 3s refer to.  If the belly is 39", drop strands at 13" and 26" ?

Ross, maybe I shoud tt the remaining 4 strands in the belly?  4 , 3, 2, then tie off the 2 and trim one off?

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Re: Whip #4

Referring to 1/3s, for me, is just that. I bind, as you suggested, closer / tighter at the handle end, and further apart / looser as it goes along to the tip.

I actually do that in layers. I will divide the length to be bound by..... you guessed it, 3. One pass to 1/3, and back up. The next pass to 2/3 and back up. The last to the remaining length to be bound and back up. This naturally helps promote a taper and a natural stiffness / flexibility with out having to overthink it.

I end the bellies with a 4 strand TT, with one of the last two strands going into the other. Then there's no need to tie-off or tape the end of the belly.

Binding the transition with the layered approach, can create a pregnant python looking transition. So, you will have to watch for that.

As for dropping strands, I let the whip tell me when to drop, and over rule it when needed. Bunching means drop, spaces means you dropped too soon.

I used to try to do it mathematically, but more often than not I would end up dropping too soon, or sometimes too late. Now paying attention to what the whip is showing me and drop , or add, accordingly.

But let your experience take you where it will with each successive build to find the method that works best for you.


Ron

It's ok if you disagree with me.
I can't force you to be right.

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Re: Whip #4

Thanks Ron.  All these nuances that you can only pick up on from doing are like bulbs going off.  Its likely I've been searching for a formula that will make the process automatic  but need to work with what develops.  A photo going from 12 to 10 plait as a remindeer to myself.

https://i.postimg.cc/CKgwJ16g/IMG-0828.jpg

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Re: Whip #4

Ross, I really like your work so far, you seem very detail-oriented, but then I would expect that of a woodworker. I drop strands as Ron describes. If you get a nice smooth taper started with the core then the rest of it just works itself out. Start your belly or overlay with enough strands to give you an angle of approximately 60 to 80 degrees (some whip makers like a flatter angle, some prefer a sharper angle,) and when it starts to get too steep (max 90 degrees) drop a strand.

"Always be on the lookout for the presence of wonder." -E. B. White

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Re: Whip #4

Sorry, that should have said Hayes, I really like your work so far.

"Always be on the lookout for the presence of wonder." -E. B. White

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Re: Whip #4

Very nice!  You see exactly, the process for a good whip can be shown in many formats but there’s no replacement for making the whip, and learning the process.

Inch by inch.

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Re: Whip #4

Looking good! There are plenty of ways to skin a cat, and we have a pretty fair spread of methods between us all; it'll take a little time, trial and error, but eventually you'll settle on a method that works for you smile there is such a wealth of information here, I guarantee you'll find things in reading that just gel with how you approach things, don't be afraid to experiment yourself either!

I'm a machinist by trade, so I personally use a complex spreadsheet I've put together to calculate all my tapers, generate cut lengths etc. And that makes me happy, but I'm on the more severe end of obsessive when it comes to numbers being right wink

Practice does not actually make perfect; Perfect practice makes perfect.

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Re: Whip #4

Thanks Andrew, I hope not too many more before a method develops!  This one got finished  last night and a handle  made this morning.  I have a couple more photos  how the handle was made if anyone is interested.

https://i.postimg.cc/43mLcrXK/IMG-0838.jpg
https://i.postimg.cc/J002LqqX/IMG-0837.jpg

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Re: Whip #4

Hayes, is  that a trick question? smile

Ron

It's ok if you disagree with me.
I can't force you to be right.

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Re: Whip #4

No trick but the flood gate might open!

First thing was select a drill bit slightly less than 3/4", in this case 11/16". 
https://i.postimg.cc/RVv2r9By/IMG-0831.jpg

Next was select a piece of maple about 1-1/4" x 16" and drill the end. 
https://i.postimg.cc/fbSr7Rct/IMG-0832.jpg

Then turn a spigot sized to fit the hole in the handle. Driving the blank this way centers it well.
https://i.postimg.cc/vBRS0whP/IMG-0833.jpg

Rough shape the handle and confirm hole depth while collar area is still oversize then turn to shape desired.  This handle was sanded with 120 grit, 180, and 220.   Bees wax applied to spinning handle and melted in with a piece of paper towel as a quick finish. 
https://i.postimg.cc/25W0bXYn/IMG-0835.jpg

Should finish this in the next day or so.

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Re: Whip #4

Nice work Hayes.

I wish I could have a workshop like that.
I would opt for a metal lathe and mill which I could use either way, either metal or wood. But that's just my personal wish list kinda thing.

Being a machinist kind of shapes my way of thinking too.

Nicely done.

Ron

It's ok if you disagree with me.
I can't force you to be right.

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Re: Whip #4

Here is #4 completed.  It cracks pretty well without much difficulty from my.  Thong length ended up close to 6' in spite of setting out to make it 5'.  My thought is that it could have been 10" shorter at the handle end but that may change over time. 

https://i.postimg.cc/brvnWxfC/IMG-0839.jpg

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Re: Whip #4

Hayes, that's a very elegant handle - and an elegant whip altogether!  Well done!

'Less is often more!'

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Re: Whip #4

Hayes, it all goes together very well.
Nice taper and the handle looks very sleek.
Good job.

How does it crack?

Ron

It's ok if you disagree with me.
I can't force you to be right.

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Re: Whip #4

Thank you Robert and Ron.  It cracks easy and plenty loud.  Played with it last evening way beyond what my arm and wrist were happy with.  No style though, its time to work on that.

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Re: Whip #4

Nice build! And that handle fits very well!

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Re: Whip #4

Very nicely done!

Inch by inch.