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Topic: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

....Cattlemans, Reverse Cattlemans, slow figure eight.

Coachmans, horizontal (overhead), side arm flick, underhand flick (badly), fast figure eight, and yesterday the Queensland Flash.

Not bad considering a little over a week ago I could only decently manage the cattlemans and overhead! I'm also trying to practise left handed as I love love love double whipping techniques.

What are other people's experiences of the learning curve associated with learning new moves? A few days ago I got the coachmans, and slow figure eight, and then promptly started whacking myself in the back of the head due to bringing the reverse cattlemans down to quickly. It was watching a video of myself doing it where I learned that I was doing it too quick.

So I suppose, I'm curious.. Do some of us learn one move at a time, or several all at once? How long does it take people? And ting.

Thanks!

Jasamine x

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Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

Learning cracks will depend on your own physical aptitude and coordination, as well as how much care and attention you give to learning the cracks. Personally I would focus on developing good coordination with basic cracks like the Cattleman's crack and Overhead crack first, since good form will follow into the other cracks and help develop good habits with all the cracks. Whatever you do, please listen to your body and slowly work up your ability with a whip so as to avoid over stressing yourself at any given time.

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Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

Not a very experienced cracker myself, but the best lesson I've learned so far is doing everything with as little force as possible. If you don't get a crack but otherwise seem to be doing the correct motions, just slowly add force until you find what's just enough and not too much. Taking a video and watching it is a very good way to go as you can see if it looks graceful or "jerky".

Those cracks you mentioned are pretty much everything I can do more or less, somehow the most difficult thing for me is the horizontal crack so that it's actually horizontal. I still suck plenty with left handed cracking too. Being an out of shape computer geek I'm not very coordinated, and that doesn't really help tongue

I'd say the same as Devin. Getting the basic cracks down will teach you a lot about how the whip moves, and the principle is always the same regardless of the move you're learning. I can also recommend Robby's teaching videos.


- Pokkis

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Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

I just make them; a performer, I am not. But, I do know some very basic ones. My best advice is to get your hands on Robby's DVD series. I learned best from those, as he allows no detail to go unnoticed or unexplained.

I guess the best way to explain it is to consider a Swiss watch. Ever notice how meticulous the craftsmanship has to be? All those parts, moving together? Well, they all go in one part at a time, same as a whip crack. Robby deconstructs the motions right down to the individual gear, then shows you how each one fits together and why it's shaped the way it is.

I got the Circus Crack on the first try, and it's nothing to do with my prowess. Robby knows how to teach. It's that simple.

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Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

Cool smile

I would like to purchase the DVDs but funds do not allow right now.

I don't think I explained myself too well.. I think I kind of went backwards a little after learning the slow figure eight, but then within two days had that sorted and three more cracks boot!

Jasamine

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Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

I first learned the overhead cracks with both hands mostly because I didn't want my Kangaroo hide whips to touch pavement.  I've picked up a few others along the way and am working to string cracks together.  I currently am working on a matched pair of 4ft kangaroo stockwhips (if by working you mean looking at them and maybe picking them up once a month or so to finish a knot) and want to learn two handed routines.

If you really think about it there are only a few basic cracks, but then change the "plane" and it becomes a different crack.  An overhand crack is still the same whether it cracks on the side, overhead, or even behind you.  The trick is getting it to crack in the proper place without hitting yourself first.  My whips are all too long for cracking behind my back, but hopefully when I finish the stockwhips I will be able to practice it.  Shorter whips get faster to a point where they are too short.  4ft should be just about right.  I am used to 6ft and longer.

Keep practicing!

Here's wishing you find time for the things you want to do, and for the things you need to do.
We see ourselves in our children and hope for a better future.

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Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

I'm thinking about making a whip cracking video of myself doing what I know. My forms probably pretty bad but ah well, I try. I would say the hardest part of getting to be a good whip cracker is learning to start a new throw of the whip after immediately finishing another. For example, using the follow through behind you on a Cattleman's crack to throw a side arm flick that sets up and overhead fast figure eight, or an overhead that leads into a Tasmanian cutback that leads into a fast figure eight. Stuff like that! You've inspired me Jasamine, I do believe I'll make a cracking demo video.

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Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

Jeff Roseborough wrote:

If you really think about it there are only a few basic cracks, but then change the "plane" and it becomes a different crack.  An overhand crack is still the same whether it cracks on the side, overhead, or even behind you.  The trick is getting it to crack in the proper place without hitting yourself first.

This ^^^ is what I've just discovered.. The slow figure eight took me to that place as I found it easier to actually look at what I was doing, and move the whole thing upfront rather than at the side. I've just done this with the coachman so also, and when I'm ready will work on bring it overhead.

Exciting stuff!

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Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

Grant Weaver wrote:

I'm thinking about making a whip cracking video of myself doing what I know. My forms probably pretty bad but ah well, I try. I would say the hardest part of getting to be a good whip cracker is learning to start a new throw of the whip after immediately finishing another. For example, using the follow through behind you on a Cattleman's crack to throw a side arm flick that sets up and overhead fast figure eight, or an overhead that leads into a Tasmanian cutback that leads into a fast figure eight. Stuff like that! You've inspired me Jasamine, I do believe I'll make a cracking demo video.

Grant.. My form is probably awful but with more practice I do notice things becoming much more effortless. I would enjoy seeing your vids.

Jasamine

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Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

The keyword is patience. It takes time for the body to "remember" things & motions. You can't force that. Just repeat, repeat and repeat. And when you're completely stuck - which will happen more often, but it's totally normal - just do something else. Even if you are able to "get" something very fast, it takes time for your body to bring it into the muscle memory. Learning fast means to forget fast. Learn slow, patient and consequent, and the lessons will be with you forever.

Robby

I have a screwdriver. I am Legend...

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Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

Reverse cattle man's??  I don't know that one.

If I can't run fast, I'll make slow look impressive.
"By the power of ibuprofen!"

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Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

Craig, the reverse cattleman's crack is the other part of a slow figure eight. As the name suggests, it's essentially cattleman's crack but in the opposite direction.


- Pokkis

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Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

I need more instructional videos. The only ones I know are cattleman's, coachman's, and an overhead that I've somehow forgotten how to do right.

If I can't run fast, I'll make slow look impressive.
"By the power of ibuprofen!"

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Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

I second Robby's videos, he is an excellent teacher.  I am a slow learner.  I take one crack and practice it to death until I get it right every time I do it.  Then I go to the next one.  I get easily overwhelmed with too much information at once, so I guess I am slow, but I personally think it is way cooler to do every crack slow and correctly, than to be performing in front of an audience and smack myself in the head.  I am preparing for a single action shoot this next month and I expect a drastically different performance after using Robby's videos than my choppy, painful performance taken from flashy limited youtube videos. Lastly, little does Robby know it, but his teaching methods work way better with a bustle and corset than Adam Winrich ever did, but then Adam spends a lot of time performing half naked, which never really works with a Victorian themed dress performance.  Seriously though, when you take it slow and you are patient, you can compensate for your elaborate dress, your body size, a gun rig, whatever, and usually (within reason) make it work for what you have going on in your personal circle without dramatic hiccups or wardrobe malfunctions.  I actually managed to make my overhead crack work while wearing my plumed hat.  Not sure if I am confident enough to wear it all the time (I really put a ton of effort into making that hat), but it can be done and you can still look awesome.

Due to rising costs, dirty deeds are no longer done dirt cheap. 
                                                                                    ~Management

15 (edited by Robby Amper 01.08.2015 23:17:53)

Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

Robby Amper wrote:

And when you're completely stuck - which will happen more often, but it's totally normal - just do something else.

Robby

A real life addendum to my above comment:
I am currently stuck on the crossover.  It is my nemesis and have been told by our fearless leader , more than once, to do something else.  Instead of going forward, I am going back to the previous cracks and getting those perfect.  Today, After about an hour of going over the "oldies"  and doing some target work, I ended the whole session with a crossover and actually got a bit of a snap once on the first swing.  Once...but it happened.  It will come, I think, just keep trying.  Close your eyes sometimes.  Sometimes if I cant get it right, if I close my eyes and clear my head I can do it...Closing your eyes gives you that flaming half-moon-chi-finger-lotus-farting action that seems to be so darned  popular now adays...Whatever it is, it works.

Due to rising costs, dirty deeds are no longer done dirt cheap. 
                                                                                    ~Management

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Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

Robby Amper wrote:

The keyword is patience.

I think that patience is the key almost challenge you face. Definitely very important for developing that muscle memory in terms of whips.

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Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

Thank you for the compliment, Jesse and David - for  your kind words on my DVDs.  I teach the way I would like to be tought. Slowly, safe and detailled. But talking about your nemesis, the Crossover. Let me tell you that every single student I ever had, had her/his own valley of death (you call it nemesis). One manages to handle the Underhand in no time. Others become desperate by trying tp perform it. And the ones who crack the crossover like nothing have massive problems with the Horizontal. And those who do the Horizontal like they never did anything else, don't get the Underhand. And so on. Everybody is different. Everybody has a different way to learn. So it is okay to watch what your whip does. But... Only for a very short time! When you get used to watch your whip instead to feel where it is, you will have big problems, later on. Just watch the WB short "Don't blink". It tells you something about looking after your whip.

The art of whip cracking (and the training) develops your ability to feel where you are. Learn to crack your whip with closed eyes. You don't need to see your whip to know where it is and what it does as long as you are connected with the whip. Feel its motion. Let yourself fall back. Trust in yourself. You will hit your back with closed eyes, yes. But didn't you hit yourself with your eyes open, too? The whip should become an extention of your arm. Of your body. Of your soul. Feel it. I said this before - the whip talks to you. All the time. All you have to do is listen. This is no spiritual mambo jambo - I don't like that esoteric stuff very much. It is my experience.

Robby

I have a screwdriver. I am Legend...

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Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

Interesting reading! Thanks folks!

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Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

Our very own Robby gave me the best training advice for cracking whips.
Crack the whip with as little effort as you possibly can,..... just enough swing to put it where it needs to be.
It doesn't have to crack loud, sometimes it's a mere pop sound.

Pay attention to how the whip roles out, and watch your plains.
Cattleman's should go straight up and back down staying on the vertical plain. If it starts to get a bit diagonal, then you need to correct your stance or grip.

I practice a four crack combo of underhand, into cattlemans then side arm into overhead, Up, down left, right.

Happy cracking,....

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Re: Basic whip cracks I've managed so far are...

Robby Amper wrote:

The art of whip cracking (and the training) develops your ability to feel where you are. Learn to crack your whip with closed eyes. You don't need to see your whip to know where it is and what it does as long as you are connected with the whip. Feel its motion. Let yourself fall back. Trust in yourself. You will hit your back with closed eyes, yes. But didn't you hit yourself with your eyes open, too? The whip should become an extension of your arm. Of your body. Of your soul. Feel it. I said this before - the whip talks to you. All the time. All you have to do is listen. This is no spiritual mumbo jumbo - I don't like that esoteric stuff very much. It is my experience.

These words are profoundly wise! I think they should form the Credo of anyone who aspires to good whip cracking!  smile

'Less is often more!'